Monday, December 26, 2011

Janmashtami or Gokulashtami

Janmashtami or Gokulashtami (Shri Krishna Janmots


This is one of the famous songs that people sing on the occasion of Janmashtami, the birth anniversary of Lord Krishna the eighth avatar (Incarnation) of Lord Vishnu. This religious festival is celebrated all over India in the month of August/September on the ashtami of Krishna Paksh or the eighth day in the month of Bhadon according to the Hindu calendar with great devotion and zeal. Janmashtami is also known as Gokulashtami, Krishnasthami, Srijayanti. The Janmashtami of Mathura and Vrindavan, the places where Lord Krishna had spent his childhood, are famous all over the world. Devotees from across the world come to these pious places to celebrate Janmasthami. On this auspicious occasion, temples and homes are beautifully decorated and illuminated. Night long prayers are offered and religious hymns are sung in temples. The priests chant holy mantras and bath the idol with Panchamrit which comprises of Gangajal (water from the holy Ganges River), milk, ghee (clarified butter), curd, and honey pouring all these from a conch shell. After this bath the idol of the infant Krishna (also known as Balmukund) is placed in a cradle. Devotional songs and dances mark the celebration of this festive occasion all over Northern India. The temples especially in Vrindavan witness an extravagant and colourful celebration on this occasion. Raslila is performed to recreate incidents from the life of Krishna and to commemorate his love for Radha.Krishna Janmashtami, also known as “Krishnashtami”,”Saatam Aatham” ,”Gokulashtami”, “Ashtami Rohini”, “Srikrishna Jayanti”, “Sree Jayanthi” or sometimes merely as “Janmashtami”, is a Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Lord Krishna, an avatar of the Hindu deity Vishnu. Krishna Janmashtami is observed on the Ashtami tithi, the eighth day of the dark half or Krishna Paksha of the month of Shraavana in the Hindu calendar, when the Rohini Nakshatra is ascendant. The festival always falls within mid-August to mid-September in the Gregorian calendar. In 2009, for example, the festival was celebrated on the 14th of August, while in 2010, the festival will be celebrated on 2nd of September. Rasa lila or dramatic enactments of the life of Krishna are a special feature in regions of Mathura and Vrindavan, and regions following Vaishnavism in Manipur. While the Rasa Lila recreates the flirtatious aspects of Krishna’s youthful days, Govinda Pathaks or Dahi Handi celebrate the God’s playful and mischievous side, where teams of young men form human pyramids to reach a high-hanging pot of butter and break it.

No comments:

Post a Comment