Friday, September 30, 2011

Gujarat Wildlife

Gujarat Wildlife

Gir National Park GujaratGujarat boasts of a rich flora and fauna. It has varied landforms, ranging from dry deciduous forests to majestic grasslands, wetlands, marine ecosystems and rich moist deciduous forests. This has made the state suitable as the habitat of rare wildlife species. Asiatic Lion, Wild Ass, Black Buck, Four-horned Antelope and Great Indian Bustard are some of the rare species preserved by the various wildlife sanctuaries in Gujarat. These rare animals constitute the wildlife heritage of India. Therefore, the national parks in Gujarat are trying their best to save these creatures from the threat of extinction.

Thanjavur

History of Tanjore


Thanjavur (also known as Tanjore) is the royal city of the Cholas and Nayaks. Thanjavur derives its name from Tanjan-an asura (giant), who according to local legend devastated the neighbourhood and was killed by Sri Anandavalli Amman and Vishnu. Sri Neelamegapperumal Tanjan's last request that the city might be named after him was granted. Chola, Chera and Pandya kings were ruling Tamizhagam even before Mahabharat period. Chola kingdom was leading and patronizing literature, art, science and religion than the other two kingdoms. The capital city of Chola was always changing. Thiruvarur was the capital during Manuneethi Cholan. Uraiyur, Pazhaiyarai, Thanjavur and Gangaikonda Cholapuram used to be the capitals of Chola Kingdom. It has been believed from the Epics that many Chola kings were ruling from Thanjavur even before Karikala Cholan.

Historians believe that Thanjavur was captured by Vijayalaya Cholan (AD 846-880) from Perumpidugu Muttaraiyan. From then till Rajaraja Cholan, Thanjavur was flourishing. Chola kings were ruling till 13th Century AD with Thanjavur as their capital. Rajendra Cholan, Rajarajan's son moved the Chola capital to Gangaikonda Cholapuram. After that Chola Kingdom started declining and the Pandya Kings captured Thanjavur.

An erstwhile viceroy of the Vijayanagar empire assumed independence and founded the dynasty of the Thanjavur Nayaks. Thanjavur remained the capital of the Nayaks for the next one hundred and twenty five years till Vijayaraghava - the last prince of the line - perished in a tragic. His General Alagiri ruled for another fourteen years. The claim to the Nayak throne through Sengamaladas, the infant son of Vijayaraghava brought on the scene the Bijapur King and his general.

General Venkaji alias Ekoji, was the half brother of Sivaji the Great. He defeated Alagiri and seized the throne in 1676 because of the dissensions in Nayaks. Mahrattas kings ruled Thanjavur as the capital for one hundred and seventy-nine years. The English first interfered in 1749 AD with a view to the restoration of the deposed King, Saiyaji.

In 1758 AD French attacked Thanjavur, but were retaken by British in 1773 AD. Thanjavur became a protected state under the East India Company. In 1799 AD Thanjavur became a British principality and its ruler Sarafoji II was given the fort of Thanjavur and an area outside it. Sivaji, his successor died in 1855 AD without an heir and after him Thanjavur passed directly under British. Its acquisition never costs the life of a single soldier, in the same manner as the Mahrattas had taken the country previously from the Nayaks.

Of the various rulers of Thanjavur, the Cholas seem to have left the Great temple of Sri Bragatheeswara a striking relic of their genius. The temple stands tall within the small fort, commonly called the Sivaganga Fort, ascribed to the Sevvappa Nayak and the big fort which encircles the city and the palace was built by Vijayaraghava the last. These two forts could be the renovations of the earlier chola fortifications.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Shiv Shakti Sangh

Shiv Shakti Sangh
The region of Candos to Visitation which includes the localities of Paillote, Carreau Laliane, Clairfonds, Modern, Vignta, Solferino and Camp Pave comprises of over 5000 Hindu Families. There was no temple in that region. Residents had to go either to La Caverne or to Bassin Road for usual prayers and ceremonies. The need for a temple in the locality was even more felt particularly in important festivals such as the Maha Shivaratree. It was the wish of one and all that a temple be constructed in that region.

Late Mr. Sookdeo Issur, donated a portion of land of 35 perches situated at Solferino No 5, Vacoas for the purpose of constructing the Shivala, which would be fully functional and should cater for the spiritual needs of the Hindu residents.

Mandir in Construction

The project was therefore initiated to realise that dream. An association was founded in November 1991 : "The Shiv Shakti Sangh". Here begins an endevouring project which has concretised in the building of the Shiv Shakti Mandir today. The association has to date 30 Founder members and 110 life members. If you wish to join the Shiv Shakti Sangh, you may do so, but please read the Constitution of the Association first.

The laying of the foundation stone ceremony was held on the 15th January 1992. The construction of the Shivala itself began in August 1992. By membership contributions, loans and donations from various people, the project was duly completed and now the shivala is fully constructed with 8 moorthis - Santoshi Maa, Shiva Parvathi, Ganesha, Karthikeya, Durga Maa, Vishnu, Nandi Devta, Ram Parivaar, Radha Krishna, Shiv Lingum and Hanuman.

Finished Temple

Various activities are organized each year among which are the Srimad Bhaghwat Katha, Ram Katha, Durga Pooja, Maha Shivaratree and ceremonies for every hindu festivals.

Recently the shivala just had a new Moorthi Staphan ceremony for a new Shivling. The new Shivling is the same in size as the one at Grand Bassin.

Managing Committee for the temple 1998-2000

Bagalamukhi yantra

Bagalamukhi yantra


Om Hleem Bagalamukhi
sarva dushtanaam vaacham mukham padam stambhaya, jivham keelaya, buddhim vinashaya
Hleem Om Phat.

The picture above is of "Bagalamukhi-yantra" and the Mantra is "Bagalamukhi-mantra". Goddess "Bagalamukhi" is often worshipped to win over foes and for victory in lawsuits. Another name for Bagalamukhi is "Peetambari" as her favorite color is Yellow (golden yellow).

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Bhubaneswari yantra


Om Hreem Bhubaneswaraye Hreem Namah

The picture above is of "Bhubaneswari-yantra" and the Mantra is "Bhubaneswari-mantra".The word "Bhubaneswari" means- the Goddess of the Universe. Having an universal command, the Goddess is able to bestow any of her 64 Kalaas (divine qualities) upon the devotee.

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Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Gundichha temple at Garoi

Gundichha temple at Garoi
Gundichha temple at Garoi
[outside view of the temple, 2 km from the main temple]

Garoi is appropriately termed as the second "Shri-Khsetra" as it is constructed as a transit house of Lord Jagannâth. All the houses and debris have got a limited life, The Jagannâth temple’s (the temple at the first or primary "Shri-Khsetra") life will be exhausted, and again after limited time will be re-constructed. Garoi will serve as the transit-house in this period of transition. The transition also includes transition of Kali Yuga to Satya Yuga. The temple has been built for the Satya Yuga. Satya, which is stepping in slowly, will have its foot established with full-might on about 22nd June 2017 . There is no overnight change anticipated in this extremely difficult Yuga Karma (duty and work of the era). Mahapurusha Shri Shri Achyutananda Goswami has hinted in his Bhabisya Malikâ (an oracle about the events of the future), that this Yuga Karma game will be played in secrecy (Shunya Khela or The Game of Shunya) with a Sandhi Kâla (i.e. with a transition period) of about 12 years. Many will remain ignorant of the game, some will have some hints but cannot dig and understand further, some devotees will be able to witness the happenings with a conscious, and will secretly wait for the re-establishment of the truth. [Off note: the Yugakarma is not about destroying the civilization or mankind, as some prophecies imply; rather, its about establishing the truth, peace, compassion, forgiveness (satya, shanti, daya, khsma) firmly; its about partial cleaning with the force of the nature and divine, not about wiping off our lovely human race with a wrath, no there is no end to our race in 2012 or any other year as some prohecies were wrongly interpreted, projecting a sense of fear. Those prophecies do serve as a warning. There is no one "Doom's day", its a slow process only to make things better at the end. What is to happen is "a shift in the global conscious" a paradigm shift- the time will change, the thinking will change, the perception will change. A little force is always required to bring about this change. Keeping righteousness and taking name of God is the path of we human beings, that is the saviour.]

His holiness Baba Shri Buddhanath Das, had prayed in his last birth that his Guru shall remain always with him. Accordingly Lord Jagannath had blessed him and had said that he (Baba) will establish a temple (the said temple of Lord Jagannath) towards the end of Kaliyuga at Garoi. From here the "Kalki Avatâr" will appear and Kayibalya (Mahâprasad) will be prepared and all categories of Seers will be present in this place (in physical or ethereal form) during the crucial Yugakarma. It is informative to state that, a large mass (in ancient Orissa - Udra desha) believe that Mahapurusha Shri Achyutanada had descended from Lord Jagannath. He is regarded as someone who has spiritually emerged with Lord Jagannath and has attained Godhood, and at the same time he also has his own identity. Hence he is called Mahapurusha (great man).

LOTHAL

LOTHAL

FACTS & FIGURES

Best time to visitWinters
LanguagesGujarati, Hindi, & English

Instant Hotel Booking for : Lothal
Hotels around Lothal

INTRODUCTION

The 4,500-year-old city of Lothal was discovered in 1954. Dating back to the second millennium b.c., Lothal was an important port on the Indian subcontinent during the Harappan era. Lothal is an important archeological site due to its scientific layout and a massive dockyard that facilitated trade with other civilizations of the time.

Tour to Lothal In the background of the valley, at 12,900 feet, is the Lari Bank glacier. Beyond lie perennial snowfields. The sparkling, snow-fed Pushpawati Ganga (River of Flowers) which runs through the entire length of the six-mile long, one and a half mile wide valley. From mid-July till the end of August, the valley with its dazzling assembly of flowers plays host >to gorgeous butterflies and dainty flying creatures by day and to millions of glow worms by night. Through the sunny hours, the flowers lean over gracefully to soften the edges of tiny melt water streams which cut through the valley while beyond, against a background of dark purple clouds, the mountains stand more exquisite than ever. In the last hour, before daylight dies, the gray mist steals in over the valley from the glacier end, while the mountains around are aglow, suffused with magic light. The dusk shuts out the flowers. Then, goes the local legend, the fairy folk with millions of glowworm lamps hover over the flowers, tending them.

LOCATION

Lothal is located in the western Indian state of Gujarat, about 85 km southwest of Ahmedabad. It was on the banks of the mythical river Saraswati, which has since dried up.

HISTORY

Lothal was discovered after India had to give up the sites of Harappa and Mohenjodaro to Pakistan during the partition in 1947. A flourishing and prosperous city during the Harappan era, its culture can be divided into two phases. The remains dating from 2440 to 1900 b.c. are of a mature and thriving Harappan culture while those belonging from 1900 to 1600 b.c. represent the late Harappan culture in its state of decline.


As in the other cities of the Indus Valley Civilization, Lothal too had excellent architecture and town planning. Excavations have revealed a town neatly divided into two parts. The upper part or the acropolis was where the ruler and other important people of the city lived while the lower part was meant for the common folks. The entire city had a scientific drainage system, well laid-out, paved roads and a bath for every house, some of which were double storied and built on mud platforms.

The most architecturally sophisticated part of Lothal was its dockyard, which provided berthing facilities for the ships. Constructed from kiln-fired bricks, the dock comprised a basin 214 meters long, 36 meters wide, and 13 meters deep. A 13-meter wide channel on the northern side was included to facilitate entry of ships. Near the dock were warehouses for storage of cargo brought in by the ships.

Lothal was an active business center and had business links with Mesopotamia, Egypt and Persia. Beads made in the city were quite famous and there is evidence of a bead factory in Lothal. Pottery was another flourishing industry. The ruins of a fire altar suggest that the people of Lothal worshipped the fire god along with the sea god.

The unique Harappan system of weights and measures was used in Lothal too. Bricks were in a perfect ratio of 100×50×25, and the decimal system was used for measuring width.

TOURISTS ATTRACTIONS

Tour to Lothal The major attractions in Lothal are the vast ruins of the ancient city. The most important are the sites of the ancient dockyard, the acropolis, the lower town, the bead factory, the warehouses, and the drainage system.

An archeological museum to the west of the ruins houses the objects found from the sites like mirrors of bronze and copper, perforated and painted potteries, toy bullock carts, beads, jewelry and a variety of objects made from stone, chert, shell, and bone. The museum also displays seals from Bahrain, terracotta figures from Sumeria, and objects from Egypt. Also on display in the museum is a plaster of Paris model of the city based on reconstructions made by archeologists.

PLACES AROUND LOTHAL

Five kilometers from Lothal is the Utelia Palace, built around the turn of the century by Neknamdar Thakore Saheb Sur Sinhji. The palace features five domes, pillared galleries, balconies and porticoes and is a typical example of the Indo-Saracenic architectural style. It has a beautiful view of the surrounding village and the Bhogavo River.


FACTS & FIGURES

Best time to visitWinters
LanguagesGujarati, Hindi, & English

Instant Hotel Booking for : Lothal
Hotels around Lothal

INTRODUCTION

The 4,500-year-old city of Lothal was discovered in 1954. Dating back to the second millennium b.c., Lothal was an important port on the Indian subcontinent during the Harappan era. Lothal is an important archeological site due to its scientific layout and a massive dockyard that facilitated trade with other civilizations of the time.

Tour to Lothal In the background of the valley, at 12,900 feet, is the Lari Bank glacier. Beyond lie perennial snowfields. The sparkling, snow-fed Pushpawati Ganga (River of Flowers) which runs through the entire length of the six-mile long, one and a half mile wide valley. From mid-July till the end of August, the valley with its dazzling assembly of flowers plays host >to gorgeous butterflies and dainty flying creatures by day and to millions of glow worms by night. Through the sunny hours, the flowers lean over gracefully to soften the edges of tiny melt water streams which cut through the valley while beyond, against a background of dark purple clouds, the mountains stand more exquisite than ever. In the last hour, before daylight dies, the gray mist steals in over the valley from the glacier end, while the mountains around are aglow, suffused with magic light. The dusk shuts out the flowers. Then, goes the local legend, the fairy folk with millions of glowworm lamps hover over the flowers, tending them.

LOCATION

Lothal is located in the western Indian state of Gujarat, about 85 km southwest of Ahmedabad. It was on the banks of the mythical river Saraswati, which has since dried up.

HISTORY

Lothal was discovered after India had to give up the sites of Harappa and Mohenjodaro to Pakistan during the partition in 1947. A flourishing and prosperous city during the Harappan era, its culture can be divided into two phases. The remains dating from 2440 to 1900 b.c. are of a mature and thriving Harappan culture while those belonging from 1900 to 1600 b.c. represent the late Harappan culture in its state of decline.

As in the other cities of the Indus Valley Civilization, Lothal too had excellent architecture and town planning. Excavations have revealed a town neatly divided into two parts. The upper part or the acropolis was where the ruler and other important people of the city lived while the lower part was meant for the common folks. The entire city had a scientific drainage system, well laid-out, paved roads and a bath for every house, some of which were double storied and built on mud platforms.

The most architecturally sophisticated part of Lothal was its dockyard, which provided berthing facilities for the ships. Constructed from kiln-fired bricks, the dock comprised a basin 214 meters long, 36 meters wide, and 13 meters deep. A 13-meter wide channel on the northern side was included to facilitate entry of ships. Near the dock were warehouses for storage of cargo brought in by the ships.

Lothal was an active business center and had business links with Mesopotamia, Egypt and Persia. Beads made in the city were quite famous and there is evidence of a bead factory in Lothal. Pottery was another flourishing industry. The ruins of a fire altar suggest that the people of Lothal worshipped the fire god along with the sea god.

The unique Harappan system of weights and measures was used in Lothal too. Bricks were in a perfect ratio of 100×50×25, and the decimal system was used for measuring width.

TOURISTS ATTRACTIONS

Tour to Lothal The major attractions in Lothal are the vast ruins of the ancient city. The most important are the sites of the ancient dockyard, the acropolis, the lower town, the bead factory, the warehouses, and the drainage system.

An archeological museum to the west of the ruins houses the objects found from the sites like mirrors of bronze and copper, perforated and painted potteries, toy bullock carts, beads, jewelry and a variety of objects made from stone, chert, shell, and bone. The museum also displays seals from Bahrain, terracotta figures from Sumeria, and objects from Egypt. Also on display in the museum is a plaster of Paris model of the city based on reconstructions made by archeologists.

PLACES AROUND LOTHAL

Five kilometers from Lothal is the Utelia Palace, built around the turn of the century by Neknamdar Thakore Saheb Sur Sinhji. The palace features five domes, pillared galleries, balconies and porticoes and is a typical example of the Indo-Saracenic architectural style. It has a beautiful view of the surrounding village and the Bhogavo River.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Shri Jagannath Mandir

Shri Jagannath Mandir -

Shri Jagannath Shri Balabhadra Maa Subhadraa temple at Garoi

Om Shri Narayanâya Namah

Akâla Mrityu Haranam, Sarva Vyâdhi Nivâranam

Visnu Pâdodakah Pivam Sirasim Dhâranâm Mahim

(PadukaMantra - Brahmavidya Bhagavatchandrika by RamDas)

His holiness Baba Shri Buddhanath Das, under the instruction of his Guru, initiated and got constructed the Jagannath temple at Garoi in the year 1993. The temple is more than 100 ft in height and is encircled by a reasonably sized temple-campus. The worshipped deities are Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra and Goddess Subhadra. The place Garoi is considered by the devotees as second "Shri-khsetra" and the "fifth dhaama". River Gobari has been declared as Gupta Ganga. The Lord-Jagannath culture is probably the only culture and tradition, where Brothers and Sister are together and are worshipped together. They are Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra (elder brother), and Maa Subhdra (the youngest of the three and their sister).

Balabhadra, Subhadra, Jagannath - the deities
[Shri Balabhadra, Maa Subhadra, Shri Jagannath]

Traaahi Guru, Traahi Visnu, Gati Mukti Taba Charanee

Sharana Achyuta, Achyuta Namastute

(JalaarpanaMantra -mantra to offer water; Brahmavidya Sisu Veda, PanchamaVeda - by Shri Balaraam Das)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aakhire aakhire daakineuchhi mu Mandira bhitare thai, Bhakata bhaavaku jaane Kaalia aau kehi jaani nahin,

Aakhire aakhire daakineuchhi mu Mandira bhitare thai, Sakala daakara bandhu-baandhava aau jane kehi naahin ...

Manara kathaa jane Kaalia, Bhaava die Bhaava paain ...

Samaste daakanti Bhaavagraahi boli, mana jaanipaare sehi ...

Staying from inside the temple he calls with his eyes, and he only knows the feelings of devotees,

Staying from inside the temple he calls with his eyes, he is friend of all who are calling and no one else ...

He knows the feelings in the heart, And gives feeling when he receives the same ...

All call him Bhaavagrahi(one who knows feelings of others), and he sees our hearts .

Lothal


Archaeological Museum, Lothal Archaeological museum is Lothal located in the Ahmedabad district of Gujarat. The museum was established in 1976 to preserve the material, which were excavated during 1950`s.The museum is divided into three galleries.

The first gallery exhibits a wonderful model of Harappan city of Lothal. The second gallery contains terracotta ornaments, replicas of seal and sealing, shell and ivory objects, copper and bronze objects, tools and potteries, beads, etc. The third gallery exhibits human figurines, weights, painted potteries, objects recovered from burials and ritual objects, miniature potteries, bricks etc. The museum also has its own library. The museum is open on all days from10 A.M. to 5 P.M except, Fridays.

Monday, September 26, 2011

Girnar Parvat.














Girnar Mountain(Temples) Ropeway gets clearance from Gujarat Govt.

Gujarat government has given final nod for setting up a ropeway parallel to the staircase on Girnar Parvat.

Chief minister Narendra Modi, in a meeting with the state wildlife board, had approved the project which was originally mooted in 1989.

"The state wildlife board and CM have approved the project and now we will recommend it for final clearance from the Central Board of Wildlife (CBW)," principal secretary environment and forest S K Nanda said.

He said that work for the proposed rope way will begin once the CBW gives its clearance as the forest department of the Central government had already cleared the proposal around 8-9 years back.

He added that Usha Braco has been given the contract to build and operate Ropeway to be built parallel to the staircase.

According to Nanda, the company will be required to make investment of around Rs 90-crore for setting up around 1.5 km ropeway line on the mountain.

Faculty of Arts

Faculty of Arts

Faculty of Arts Dome, designed by Robert Fellowes Chisholm (1840-1915) in Indo-Saracenic style, modeled on Gol Gumbaz[1]

The Faculty of Arts is famous for its education procedure . It faculty building is known for its Gumbaz (The Dome), which is the second largest dome in Asia.

[edit] Department of English

The Department of English is one of the oldest in Gujarat.

[edit] Departmental Library

The Department of English has a library for its students and teachers. It is housed in a spacious room with facilities for reading and conference. It has a collection of around 1,200 titles of poetry, fiction and drama, literary criticism and theory, and works on individual authors and texts. The richest sections are on literary criticism and theory, and fiction. The library receives gifts from the British Council, the USIS, and individuals including members of the department teaching staff. The library has borrowed important books from the collection of Smt. Hansa Mehta library of the university for its teachers and research scholars.

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Gandhinagar

Gandhinagar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Gandhinagar

ગાંધીનગર

Ecopolite city/Cosmopolite city
capital
Panorama of Gujarat Legislative assembly
Gandhinagar
Location of Gandhinagar
in Gujarat and India
Coordinates 23.22°N 72.68°E / 23.22°N 72.68°E / 23.22; 72.68Coordinates: 23.22°N 72.68°E / 23.22°N 72.68°E / 23.22; 72.68
Country India
State Gujarat
District(s) Gandhinagar
Municipal commissioner R.C.Kharsan
Population

Density

2,095,891 (2010)

11,841 /km2 (30,668 /sq mi)

Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)
Area

Elevation

177 square kilometres (68 sq mi)

81 metres (266 ft)

Gandhinagar (Gujarati: ગાંધીનગર)(About this sound pronunciation ) is the capital of the state of Gujarat in western India. Gandhinagar is located on the west central point of the Industrial corridor between Delhi, the capital of India and Mumbai, the Financial & Economical capital of India.


Etymology

In 1960, when the old Bombay State was bifurcated into the present states of Maharashtra and Gujarat, Bombay city fell to the share of Maharastra. It was then decided to build an entirely new capital for Gujarat[1].

Gandhinagar, Gujarat's new capital city, lies on the west bank of the Sabarmati River, about 464 km away from Mumbai, the financial capital of India. Gandhinagar presents the spacious, well-organized look of an architecturally integrated city[1].

Around the central Government complex, stretch 30 sectors into which the city has been divided. Each sector has its own shopping and community center, primary school, health center, Government and private housing[1]. Apart from which there is a generous provision for wide open green parks, extensive planting and a large recreational area along the river giving the city a lush green garden-city atmosphere[1].

The famous Akshardham temple is located in Gandhinagar. There was, however, tremendous political pressure to make Gandhinagar a purely Indian enterprise, partly because the state of Gujarat was the birthplace of Mahatma Gandhi[1]. Kalia illumines Kahn's early influence in the city and his replacement by Doshi and then by American-trained H. K. Mewada, who had apprenticed with Le Corbusier in Chandigarh. Kalia shows that, unlike the other two cities, Gandhinagar would become emblematic of Gandhian ideals of swadeshi (indigenous) goods and swaraj (self-rule)[1].

[edit] History

In the 13th century, King Pethasinh of Pethapur, ruled over Shertha town. After the death of Pethasinh, the Sultanate of Patan used this land as battle ground. Sultan Ahmed Shah decided to move his capital from Patan to a new city, and built Ahmedabad. In 1960, Bombay state was split in two different states, Gujarat and Maharashtra. Ahmedabad became capital of Gujarat, and a new capital city was to be built on land which was once part of Pethapur state.

Panorama Of Gujarat Legislative Assembly at Sector 10
Akshardham Temple at Sector 20

The city's infrastructure was planned by two Indian planners, H.K. Mewada (educated at Cornell University)and Prakash Apte. Mewada, a Gandhian, had worked as a trainee under Le Corbusier in the Chandigarh Project in the 1950s. Gandhinagar's streets are numbered, and have cross streets named for Gujarati alphabets like "k" , "kh" , "g" , "gh" , "ch" , "chh" , "j" . All streets cross every kilometre, and at every crossing traffic circles decrease the speed of traffic.

rishi

Rishi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A view of the upper Ganges area of Rishikesh, India. Birthplace of the Vedic rishis.

Rishi (Sanskrit: ṛṣi, Devanagari: ऋषि) (Rishi Jobanputra) denotes the composers of Vedic hymns. However, according to post-Vedic tradition the rishi is a "seer" to whom the Vedas were "originally revealed" through states of higher consciousness. The rishis rose into prominence when Vedic Hinduism took shape, perhaps as far back as some three thousand years ago.

It has often been asserted that some of the ancient rishis were in fact women.[1] According to the Sarvanukramani text, there were as many as 20 women among the authors of the Rig Veda, known as rishika.

One of the foundational qualities of a ṛṣi is satyavācas (one who speaks truth) when composing Vedic hymns. According to tradition, other sages might falter, but a ṛṣi was believed to speak truth only, because he existed in the Higher World (the unified field of consciousness) according to the Sanskrit 'riṣi'. Ṛṣis provided knowledge to the world which included the knowledge of Vedas.

"As the rishis described it, awareness begins in an unbounded state with pure consciousness and then cascades, plane by plane, until it reaches the physical world. That each level is within you, and the choice of boundaries - or unboundedness - is yours alone. Therefore journeys to heaven and hell are daily occurrences, not far-off possibilities." [2]

"To the rishis, bliss (ananda) was more than the expansive feeling of ecstasy. It was the basic vibration, or hum, of the universe, the ground state from which all diversity springs... the possibility for creation to manifest. Bliss itself is far from the feeling of happiness or even joy, though in diluted form it can be experienced as both. It is simply the vibratory connection that allows pure consciousness to enter into creation".[3]

"The seer, or observer, is rishi. The process of projecting is devata. The thing projected/created is chhandas. In a movie house, the audience is the rishi, the machine run by the projectionist is the devata, and the images on the screen are the chhandas. It's not so important to remember these terms, but ancient sages hit upon a universal rule of consciousness, called three-in-one. If you occupy any of these roles - seer, seen, or the process of seeing - you occupy all of them. These modest-sounding words have the potential to revolutionize the world."[4

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Tapasya

Tapasya

Menaka seduces Vishwamitra. Painting by Raja Ravi Varma.

This incident made a deep impression on the King. He realized that the power obtained by penances was far greater than mere physical might. He renounced his kingdom and began his quest to become a greater rishi than Vasishta. He took on the name Vishwamitra. It is very interesting to see all the challenges that Viswamitra faced in his life to become a Brahmarishi, before eventually giving up the greed to possess the cow. After many trials and undergoing many austerities, Vishwamitra at last obtained the title of Brahmarishi from Vasishta himself. During this time he had a daughter named Shakuntala (who appears in the Mahabharata) with Menaka, an apsara in the court of Indra. Son of Shakuntala became a great emperor. He came to be known as Emperor Bharata, in whose name the land of India got its name Bharat.

[edit] Alternate version

Kaushika seeks to attain the same spiritual power as Vasishta, to become his equal, a brahmarishi. He undertakes a fierce penance for one thousand years, after which Brahma names him a Rajarishi, or royal sage.

After another long penance of ten thousand years, Brahma names him a rishi, thus leaving his royal lineage permanently.

At this point, Indra, the king of Swarga attempts to test the tapasvin by sending Menaka, an apsara to seduce him. Kaushik then lives with Menaka for 10 years. They have a baby girl Shakuntala. Kaushik becomes angry as Menaka had destroyed his years of meditation and thus he cursed her that she won't possess her beauty, of which she was proud, in next birth. And hence in the next birth she became a monkey and mother of Hanuman, Anjani.

Kaushika now goes to the banks of the river Kaushiki, which is the spirit of his own sister. After many thousands of years of penance, Brahma names him maharishi, but also tells him that he hasn't become a jitendriya yet, lacking control over his passions. This is brought to light to Kaushika when he angrily curses Rambha, an apsara sent by Indra to seduce Kaushika again, to become a stone for a thousand years.

Sayajirao गैक्वाद

Sayajirao Gaekwad III

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Sayajirao III Gaekwad, Maharaja of Baroda, 1919

See also Gaekwad.

Sayajirao Gaekwad III (Shrimant Gopalrao Gaekwad); (10 March 1863 – 6 February 1939), was the Maharaja of Baroda State from 1875 to 1939, and is notably remembered for reforming much of his state during his rule.


Early life

Sayajirao was born at Kavlana on the 11 March 1863 as Shrimant Gopalrao Gaekwad, second son of Meherban Shrimant Kashirao Bhikajirao [Dada Sahib] Gaekwad (1832–1877) and Shrimant Akhand Soubhagyavati Ummabai Sahib. His branch of the Gaekwad dynasty was a cadet branch descended from a morganatic marriage of the first Raja of Baroda and so was not expected to succeed to the throne.

[edit] Matters of succession

Sayajirao with Sir Richard Temple, the Governor of Bombay and other members of the court. c. 1880

Following the death of Sir Khanderao Gaekwad (1828–1870), the popular Maharaja of Baroda, in 1870, it was expected that his brother, Malharrao (1831–1882), would succeed him. However, Malharrao had already proven himself to be of the vilest character and had been imprisoned earlier for conspiring to assassinate Khanderao. As Khanderao's widow, Maharani Jamnabai (1853–1898) was already pregnant with a posthumous child, the succession was delayed until the gender of the child could be proven. The child proved to be a daughter, and so upon her birth on 5 July 1871, Malharrao ascended the throne.

Malharrao spent money liberally, nearly emptying the Baroda coffers (he commissioned a pair of solid gold cannon and a carpet of pearls,among other expenses) and soon reports reached the Resident of Malharrao's gross tyranny and cruelty. Malharrao further attempted to cover up his deeds by poisoning the Resident with a compound of arsenic. By order of the Secretary of State for India, Lord Salisbury, Malharrao was deposed on 10 April 1875 and exiled to Madras, where he died in obscurity in 1882.

[edit] Ascending the Throne

Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III, Kala Ghoda Statue at Vadodara

With the throne of Baroda now vacant, Maharani Jamnabai called on the heads of the extended branches of the dynasty to come to Baroda and present themselves and their sons in order to decide upon a successor.

Kashirao and his three sons, Anandrao (1857–1917), Gopalrao (1863–1938) and Sampatrao (1865–1934) walked to Baroda from Kavlana-a distance of some 600 kilometers-to present themselves to Jamnabai. It is reported that when each son was asked the purported reason for presenting themselves at Baroda, Gopalrao unhesitatingly stated:

"I have come here to rule"

He was selected by the British Government as successor and was accordingly adopted by Maharani Jamnabai, on 27 May 1875. He was also given a new name, Sayajirao. He ascended the gadi (throne) at Baroda, 16 June 1875 but being a minor reigned under a Council of Regency until he came of age and was invested with full ruling powers on 28 December 1881. During his minority he was extensively tutored in administrative skills by Raja Sir T. Madhava Rao who groomed his young protégé into being a ruler with foresight and with a will to provide welfare to his people. In this period Sir T. Madhava Rao restored the state to its normal conditions following the chaos in which it had been left by Malharrao. Not a little credit for what the Maharaja achieved during his life in every sphere of human activity must be given to F. A. H. Elliot. The learning which Sayajirao acquired under Mr. Eliot's able guidance made him a great statesman, educator, and ruler. It is acknowledged that the Maharaja Sayajirao was a prince among the educators and an educator among the princes.

Friday, September 23, 2011

Rukmini Devi Temple


Rukmini Devi TempleThis small temple, 1.5 km north, is an architectural masterpiece. Rukmini is the most important of Krishna`s 16,108 wives, which might be the reason to dedicate a separate temple in her honour. The temple walls are decorated with beautiful paintings depicting her pastimes with her husband. It is believed to have been built in the 12th century.

The folklore that got attached with is, one day Durvasa Muni, who is angered at a slightest touch, was invited to dinner by Lord Krishna and his wife Rukmini. As per etiquette, a host is not supposed to eat until the guest is contented with his/her meal. On the way to dinner, however Rukmini felt thirsty and asked Krishna for help. Krishna then put his foot on the ground and the Ganges water flowed forth from earth, while Durvasa was not noticing. But, as Rukmini was drinking water, the Muni turned over and saw her drinking water without his permission. He was terribly angered at this episode, and cursed Rukmini to live apart forever from Krishna. That is basically the reason why Krishna temple is in the town, while Rukmini`s is in the outskirts.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Bharuch


Jhagadia Tirth, Bharuch, GujaratBharuch (also known as Broach) is a district in the southern part of Gujarat. The district`s population is compared with Greater Boston. The Narmada River outlets into the Gulf of Khambat through its lands and that shipping artery gave inland access to the kingdoms and empires located in the central and northern parts of the Indian subcontinent. The city of Bharuch today serves as a large seaport city to more than a million inhabitants; it is a municipal area of Bharuch district. As a trading sea depot, the limitations of coastal shipping made it a regular terminus via several mixed trade routes of the fabled spice and silk trading between East and West, so that it came to be known by various names in history, like- Bharakuccha, Bhrigu Kaksha (the domain of Bhrigu, an ancient Indian saint), Bhroach, and of course Bhrauch. According to the 2001 census, Bharuch has a population of 148,391. It is a celebrated place for its salty peanuts.

Dwarka

Dwarkanath Temple
Dwarka serves as the entrance to the western parts of India. It owes its name to the word `dwar`, referring to door. Amongst the Holy places in Dwarka, a name to reckon with is that of Dwarkanath Temple, dedicated solely to Lord Krishna. The strange history of Dwarkanath Temple is that the five-storey towered masterpiece was built by Sambha, Krishna`s grandson. The city was built by Vishwakarma, the ethereal architect. It stands on a support of sixty columns. The whole structure is built entirely with limestone and sand. A towering, richly carved spire can be seen in the outer part of the temple. The structural composition of the temple is quite complex, with two gateways, `Swarga Dwar`, the entrance for the pilgrims and `Moksha Dwar`, the exit for the pilgrims. The idol measures 2.25 feet in height in smooth, glossy black stone. The four hands of the Lord have a conch, wheel, a metallic weapon and a lotus respectively. It is popularly called `Shankha Chakra Gada Padma Chaturbhuj`. From the temple one can watch the `sangam` (meeting point) of Gomati River, flowing towards the sea. There are shrines of Vasudeva, Devaki, Balrama, Revathy, Subhadra, Rukmini Devi, Jambavathi Devi and Satyabhama Devi. There is a special temple made for Rukmini Devi on the way to Bet Dwarka. Bet Dwarka can be reached by boat. It is the very palace where Lord Krishna ruled during his time. There is the similar idol of Lord Dwarkanath kept in Bet Dwarka. The temple looks like a palace and has scores of shrines of Lakshmi-Narayan, Trivikrama, Jambavathi Devi, Sathyabhama Devi and Rukmini Devi. The structural pattern of the workmanship is so strong that even the earthquake of 2001 could not destroy it. On Janmashtami, the birthday of Lord Krishna, Dwarkanath Temple is bejewelled in its own finery. Lakhs of devotees from all over the world throng this place to offer their prayers and be a tiny part of this huge celebration.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Nagnath Temple

Nageshwar Temple
Nageshwar Temple or is a famous Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Shiva enroute Gomati Dwarka and Bet Dwarka island on the coast of Saurashtra. It is one of the 12 Jyotirlingas, the sacred abodes of or Lord Shiva. According to Hindu mythology, the Nageshwar (Lord of snakes in Sanskrit) symbolises the removal of poison (evil activities) by Shiva. In the Rudra Samhita the deity is referred to as Daarukaavane Naagesham.

According to Shiv Purana, a Shiva devotee Supriya was attacked by the demon named Daaruka while travelling on a boat. The demon imprisoned him along with several others at his capital Daarukaavana where he resided with his wife Daaruki. Supriya advised every prisoner to chant the mantra `Aum Namaha Shivaya`. When Daruk came to know about this recitation, furiously, he ran to kill Supriya. But, at that very moment Lord Shiva appeared in the form of a Jyotirlingam, vanquishing the demon with the Pashupata Ashtram. This Jyotirlingam manifestation of Shiva is worshipped as Nageshwara. According to Shiv Purana, whosoever praises with devotion the birth and greatness of this Jyotirlinga, shall beget all material happiness and divine status at the end.

जामनगर

Dwarkanath TempleJamnagar district is located in Gujarat, with Jamnagar city serving as its administrative headquarters. The famous city of Dwarka is situated in this district. Jamnagar has a population of 1,904,278, out of which 43.91% are urban (2001 census) (wikipedia encyclopedia). Jamnagar city is also the municipal corporation of Jamnagar, the district. The city was build up substantially by Maharaja Kumar Shri Ranjitsinghji in the 1920s, when the district was known as Nawanagar. The district lies south to the Gulf of Kutch. Jamnagar has shot to prominence as Reliance Industries, India`s largest private company, established the world`s largest oil refinery near Moti Khavdi village. It is also home to Essar Oil, another leading oil refinery of India.

Dwarka Group of Temples, Jamnagar, Gujarat: Dwarka, according to Hindu mythology, was the holy abode of Lord Krishna, thereby, housing numerous temples dedicated to Him.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Jagannath temple


Lord JagannathDevadasis of Jagannath temple in Puri have been greatly instrumental in bringing about the system of Odissi dance and music. The Devadasis, literally meaning the maidservants of the Lord were also known as Devaganikas or Devadarikas. The Devadasis of Puri were popularly known as Maharis. It is believed that the term Mahari comes from `Maharani` meaning Queen. This is because there are certain similarities between the Queen and the Mahari. Both the Queen and the Mahari do not ever adopt the signs of a widow. They are eternally Sadhaba (having a husband). Both of them are `mobile Goddess` and `auspicious ladies`. The Maharis used to serve the Mahasrama (the king). So they were called Maharis.

As per convention the Devadasis are married to Lord Jagannath and after becoming Devadasis they are expected not to marry again. Henceforward they are treated as Lord`s wife. That the Devadasis were held in high esteem, at one time is well proved by the fact that king Karna of Soma dynasty donated a village to a Devadasi named Karpura Sri. Later he also married her. Also, it is a well-known fact that the poet Jayadeva`s wife Padmavati opted to become a Devadasi.


Essentially, there are two types of Devadasis. There is one type of Devadasis who are offered by their parents to the Lord or who volunteer themselves to be Devadasis in fulfilment of a vow. They live as spinsters and lead a life of abstinence and austerity serving God as Devadasis. They were called Niuchhiali Dasis. The other kind are not expected to maintain Brahmacharya and for this reason were suspect in the eyes of the public. But both the kinds were generally called Maharis.

The Mahari Seva, the services to be rendered by the Maharis, are mentioned in the section 75 and 76 of the Record of Rights prepared under the Puri Sri Jagannath Temple Administration Act, Orissa. The Devadasis are divided into two types, namely, Bhitara Gaauni and Samprada Nijoga. Though the works are divided among them, the nature of work does not differ much. They sing Mangala Gana during various auspicious functions in the temple or in the palace. When Krishna janma (birth of Lord Krishna) is dramatised in the temple, the Devadasis play the role of Yashoda and Rohini and breast-feed Krishna. They also accompany the processions of the Lord during various festivals. In some festivals the dance accompanies song, in some there is only dance and music and no song. The Devdasis dance and sing during the following festivals: Damanaka Chaturdasi, Doha, Pushyaviseka, Rath Yatra, Snan Yatra. During Dakshinayan they only sing. During various Dhupa (breakfast, lunch, dinner etc.) and while accompanying Chandan procession they dance to the tune of music and do not sing. In front of goddess Vimala, during Solapuja, they only dance. There is no music or song.

The position of the Devadasis in society has courted quite a bit of controversy. Since Ray Ramananda`s time (16th century) when the Devadasis were freed from the bondage of temple discipline and participated in royal functions and public functions, they became suspect in the eyes of the public. Since last century they were held in low esteem. Only recently, when the system is virtually extinct, the system is being glorified.


baruch

Bahucharaji Temple, Mehsana, Patan, GujaratIt is considered as one of the three holy `Shakti Peeths` in Gujarat. Millions of Hindu devotees throng the temple every month. Bahucharaji Temple is the famous temple of Goddess Bahucharji nestled at the Mehsanan town near the Patan district. There are 3 temples of Bahucrarji- `Adyasthan` is the original temple, while the middle temple is known as `Madhyasthan`. In the nearby town, there is a Varkhadi tree, where it is believed that the Goddess had made an appearance Herself.

Bahucharaji temple was built in 1839 AD by Gaikwad Sarkar, Maharaja of Baroda. The inner walls are intrinsically decorated with medieval carvings and animated paintings. The South and North Gates are built in the shape of a zharukha. There is also a `havan mandap` for performing yajnas. The temple has been constructed keeping in mind the laws of Vaastu Shastra. A vast meeting hall has been built by the temple trustees to organize meetings, functions and restrict footfall of the worshippers. Fairs are held every year, in the months of Chaitra and Ashadhi purnima. Bahucharaji Temple is open from 5.00 AM to 9.00 PM, while pujas are conducted from 7.00 AM till 11.00 Am.

Monday, September 19, 2011

lakha

Meenakshi Temple - Tamil NaduTemples in India is one concept that perhaps is no more novel or pioneering in contemporary times. India has been blessed enough to be the home to lakhs of religious institutions since uncharted periods, times when even man did not much comprehend about existence or daily life. Archetypal temple architecture from ancient times re-described massiveness or structural epitome in rock or pure stone. Every religious faith had a story to essay; every religion had a point to establish through their impeccable builds. It also becomes quite evident that emperors and dynasties reigning in various epoch, has forever made their view etched in pages in Indian history. As such, be it in Christianity, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Hinduism, Vaishnavism or Islamic, Indian temples by religion is a broad and panoptic perception which perhaps will never cease to exist. Temple building and veneration is everlasting, as long as humanity exists to have faith in the almighty. There survives and persists temples for every religion in India.

India fundamentally being a religious country has its huge population rooted to one or the other religion. That is why it possesses an extensive range of temples on various religions like there are Buddhist temples, Sikh temples, Hindu temples and Jain shrines. India, referred to as a `sovereign socialist secular democratic republic`, people from every religion has equal liberty to offer prayer to their respective faiths and Lords. Indian temples by religion become, thus, a mind-blowing concept that can perhaps only be envisioned virtually.